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Gender equity in ergonomics: does muscle effort in laparoscopic surgery differ between men and women?
Surg Endosc. 2022 01; 36(1):396-401.SE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Women surgeons may experience more ergonomic challenges while performing surgery. We aimed to assess ergonomics between men and women surgeons.

METHODS

Laparoscopic surgeons from a single institution were enrolled. Demographics and intraoperative data were collected. Muscle groups were evaluated objectively using surface electromyography (EMG; TrignoTM, Delsys, Inc., Natick, MA), and comprised upper trapezius (UT), anterior deltoid, flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor digitorum (ED). Comparisons were made between women (W) and men (M) for each muscle group, assessing maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and median frequency (MDF). The Piper Fatigue Scale-12 (PFS-12) was used to assess self-perceived fatigue. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS v26.0, α = 0.05.

RESULTS

18 surgeries were recorded (W:8, M:10). Women had higher activation of UT (32% vs 23%, p < 0.001), FCR (33% vs 16%, p < 0.001), and ED (13% vs 10%, p < 0.001), and increased effort of ED (90.4 ± 18.13 Hz vs 99.1 ± 17.82 Hz). Comparisons were made between W and M for each muscle group, assessing MVC and MDF.

CONCLUSIONS

After controlling for surgeon's height and duration of surgery, an increase in muscle activation was seen for women laparoscopic surgeons. Since poor ergonomics could be a major cause of work-related injuries, we must understand differences in ergonomics between men and women and evaluate which factors impact these variations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, General Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986246 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-6246, USA. p.rodriguesarmijo@unmc.edu. Center for Advanced Surgical Technology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA. p.rodriguesarmijo@unmc.edu.College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA.Department of Surgery, General Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986246 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-6246, USA. Center for Advanced Surgical Technology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA.Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, Medical Center, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS, USA.Department of Surgery, General Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986246 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-6246, USA. College of Allied Health Professions, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA.Department of Surgery, Monmouth Medical Center, Robert Wood Johnson Barnabas Health, Long Branch, NJ, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33492502

Citation

Armijo, Priscila Rodrigues, et al. "Gender Equity in Ergonomics: Does Muscle Effort in Laparoscopic Surgery Differ Between Men and Women?" Surgical Endoscopy, vol. 36, no. 1, 2022, pp. 396-401.
Armijo PR, Flores L, Pokala B, et al. Gender equity in ergonomics: does muscle effort in laparoscopic surgery differ between men and women? Surg Endosc. 2022;36(1):396-401.
Armijo, P. R., Flores, L., Pokala, B., Huang, C. K., Siu, K. C., & Oleynikov, D. (2022). Gender equity in ergonomics: does muscle effort in laparoscopic surgery differ between men and women? Surgical Endoscopy, 36(1), 396-401. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-021-08295-3
Armijo PR, et al. Gender Equity in Ergonomics: Does Muscle Effort in Laparoscopic Surgery Differ Between Men and Women. Surg Endosc. 2022;36(1):396-401. PubMed PMID: 33492502.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender equity in ergonomics: does muscle effort in laparoscopic surgery differ between men and women? AU - Armijo,Priscila Rodrigues, AU - Flores,Laura, AU - Pokala,Bhavani, AU - Huang,Chun-Kai, AU - Siu,Ka-Chun, AU - Oleynikov,Dmitry, Y1 - 2021/01/25/ PY - 2020/05/08/received PY - 2021/01/05/accepted PY - 2021/1/26/pubmed PY - 2021/1/26/medline PY - 2021/1/25/entrez KW - Ergonomics KW - Gender equity KW - Laparoscopic surgery KW - Minimally invasive surgery KW - Musculoskeletal disorders KW - Operating room SP - 396 EP - 401 JF - Surgical endoscopy JO - Surg Endosc VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Women surgeons may experience more ergonomic challenges while performing surgery. We aimed to assess ergonomics between men and women surgeons. METHODS: Laparoscopic surgeons from a single institution were enrolled. Demographics and intraoperative data were collected. Muscle groups were evaluated objectively using surface electromyography (EMG; TrignoTM, Delsys, Inc., Natick, MA), and comprised upper trapezius (UT), anterior deltoid, flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor digitorum (ED). Comparisons were made between women (W) and men (M) for each muscle group, assessing maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and median frequency (MDF). The Piper Fatigue Scale-12 (PFS-12) was used to assess self-perceived fatigue. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS v26.0, α = 0.05. RESULTS: 18 surgeries were recorded (W:8, M:10). Women had higher activation of UT (32% vs 23%, p < 0.001), FCR (33% vs 16%, p < 0.001), and ED (13% vs 10%, p < 0.001), and increased effort of ED (90.4 ± 18.13 Hz vs 99.1 ± 17.82 Hz). Comparisons were made between W and M for each muscle group, assessing MVC and MDF. CONCLUSIONS: After controlling for surgeon's height and duration of surgery, an increase in muscle activation was seen for women laparoscopic surgeons. Since poor ergonomics could be a major cause of work-related injuries, we must understand differences in ergonomics between men and women and evaluate which factors impact these variations. SN - 1432-2218 UR - https://neuro.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33492502/Gender_equity_in_ergonomics:_does_muscle_effort_in_laparoscopic_surgery_differ_between_men_and_women L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-021-08295-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -