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Resilience, self-esteem and self-compassion in adults with spina bifida.
Spinal Cord. 2014 Feb; 52(2):167-71.SC

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN

Cross-sectional survey.

OBJECTIVES

To examine factors that may enhance and promote resilience in adults with spina bifida.

SETTING

Community-based disability organisations within Australia.

METHODS

Ninety-seven adults with a diagnosis of spina bifida (SB) completed a survey comprising of demographic questions in addition to standardised self-report measures of physical functioning (Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique), resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, 10 item), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale), self-compassion (Self-compassion Scale) and psychological distress (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, 21 item).

RESULTS

The majority (66%) of respondents reported moderate to high resilience. Physical disability impacted on coping, with greater CD-RISC 10 scores reported by individuals who were functionally independent in addition to those who experienced less medical co-morbidities. Significant correlations between resilience and psychological traits (self-esteem r=0.36, P<0.01; self-compassion r=0.40, P<0.01) were also noted. However, the combined contribution of these variables only accounted for 23% of the total variance in resilience scores (R(2)=0.227, F(5,94)=5.23, P<0.01).

CONCLUSION

These findings extend current understanding of the concept of resilience in adults with a congenital physical disability. The suggestion is that resilience involves a complex interplay between physical determinants of health and psychological characteristics, such as self-esteem and self-compassion. It follows that cognitive behavioural strategies with a focus on self-management may, in part, contribute to the process of resilience in this group. Further large-scale and longitudinal research will help to confirm these findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24322213

Citation

Hayter, M R., and D S. Dorstyn. "Resilience, Self-esteem and Self-compassion in Adults With Spina Bifida." Spinal Cord, vol. 52, no. 2, 2014, pp. 167-71.
Hayter MR, Dorstyn DS. Resilience, self-esteem and self-compassion in adults with spina bifida. Spinal Cord. 2014;52(2):167-71.
Hayter, M. R., & Dorstyn, D. S. (2014). Resilience, self-esteem and self-compassion in adults with spina bifida. Spinal Cord, 52(2), 167-71. https://doi.org/10.1038/sc.2013.152
Hayter MR, Dorstyn DS. Resilience, Self-esteem and Self-compassion in Adults With Spina Bifida. Spinal Cord. 2014;52(2):167-71. PubMed PMID: 24322213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resilience, self-esteem and self-compassion in adults with spina bifida. AU - Hayter,M R, AU - Dorstyn,D S, Y1 - 2013/12/10/ PY - 2013/09/04/received PY - 2013/10/19/revised PY - 2013/11/05/accepted PY - 2013/12/11/entrez PY - 2013/12/11/pubmed PY - 2014/10/17/medline SP - 167 EP - 71 JF - Spinal cord JO - Spinal Cord VL - 52 IS - 2 N2 - STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. OBJECTIVES: To examine factors that may enhance and promote resilience in adults with spina bifida. SETTING: Community-based disability organisations within Australia. METHODS: Ninety-seven adults with a diagnosis of spina bifida (SB) completed a survey comprising of demographic questions in addition to standardised self-report measures of physical functioning (Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique), resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, 10 item), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale), self-compassion (Self-compassion Scale) and psychological distress (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, 21 item). RESULTS: The majority (66%) of respondents reported moderate to high resilience. Physical disability impacted on coping, with greater CD-RISC 10 scores reported by individuals who were functionally independent in addition to those who experienced less medical co-morbidities. Significant correlations between resilience and psychological traits (self-esteem r=0.36, P<0.01; self-compassion r=0.40, P<0.01) were also noted. However, the combined contribution of these variables only accounted for 23% of the total variance in resilience scores (R(2)=0.227, F(5,94)=5.23, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: These findings extend current understanding of the concept of resilience in adults with a congenital physical disability. The suggestion is that resilience involves a complex interplay between physical determinants of health and psychological characteristics, such as self-esteem and self-compassion. It follows that cognitive behavioural strategies with a focus on self-management may, in part, contribute to the process of resilience in this group. Further large-scale and longitudinal research will help to confirm these findings. SN - 1476-5624 UR - https://neuro.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24322213/Resilience_self_esteem_and_self_compassion_in_adults_with_spina_bifida_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sc.2013.152 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -