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When leaving your ex, love yourself: observational ratings of self-compassion predict the course of emotional recovery following marital separation.
Psychol Sci. 2012 Mar; 23(3):261-9.PS

Abstract

Divorce is a highly stressful event, and much remains to be learned about the factors that promote psychological resilience when marriages come to an end. In this study, divorcing adults (N = 109) completed a 4-min stream-of-consciousness recording about their marital separation at an initial laboratory visit. Four judges rated the degree to which participants exhibited self-compassion (defined by self-kindness, an awareness of one's place in shared humanity, and emotional equanimity) in their recordings. Judges evidenced considerable agreement in their ratings of participants' self-compassion, and these ratings demonstrated strong predictive utility: Higher levels of self-compassion at the initial visit were associated with less divorce-related emotional intrusion into daily life at the start of the study, and this effect persisted up to 9 months later. These effects held when we accounted for a number of competing predictors. Self-compassion is a modifiable variable, and if our findings can be replicated, they may have implications for improving the lives of divorcing adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Arizona, USA. sbarra@email.arizona.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22282874

Citation

Sbarra, David A., et al. "When Leaving Your Ex, Love Yourself: Observational Ratings of Self-compassion Predict the Course of Emotional Recovery Following Marital Separation." Psychological Science, vol. 23, no. 3, 2012, pp. 261-9.
Sbarra DA, Smith HL, Mehl MR. When leaving your ex, love yourself: observational ratings of self-compassion predict the course of emotional recovery following marital separation. Psychol Sci. 2012;23(3):261-9.
Sbarra, D. A., Smith, H. L., & Mehl, M. R. (2012). When leaving your ex, love yourself: observational ratings of self-compassion predict the course of emotional recovery following marital separation. Psychological Science, 23(3), 261-9. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797611429466
Sbarra DA, Smith HL, Mehl MR. When Leaving Your Ex, Love Yourself: Observational Ratings of Self-compassion Predict the Course of Emotional Recovery Following Marital Separation. Psychol Sci. 2012;23(3):261-9. PubMed PMID: 22282874.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - When leaving your ex, love yourself: observational ratings of self-compassion predict the course of emotional recovery following marital separation. AU - Sbarra,David A, AU - Smith,Hillary L, AU - Mehl,Matthias R, Y1 - 2012/01/26/ PY - 2012/1/28/entrez PY - 2012/1/28/pubmed PY - 2012/7/19/medline SP - 261 EP - 9 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - Divorce is a highly stressful event, and much remains to be learned about the factors that promote psychological resilience when marriages come to an end. In this study, divorcing adults (N = 109) completed a 4-min stream-of-consciousness recording about their marital separation at an initial laboratory visit. Four judges rated the degree to which participants exhibited self-compassion (defined by self-kindness, an awareness of one's place in shared humanity, and emotional equanimity) in their recordings. Judges evidenced considerable agreement in their ratings of participants' self-compassion, and these ratings demonstrated strong predictive utility: Higher levels of self-compassion at the initial visit were associated with less divorce-related emotional intrusion into daily life at the start of the study, and this effect persisted up to 9 months later. These effects held when we accounted for a number of competing predictors. Self-compassion is a modifiable variable, and if our findings can be replicated, they may have implications for improving the lives of divorcing adults. SN - 1467-9280 UR - https://neuro.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22282874 L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0956797611429466?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -