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Precipitating and aggravating factors of migraine versus tension-type headache.
Headache. 2001 Jun; 41(6):554-8.H

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We conducted the present study to determine whether there are headache precipitating and aggravating factors that differentiate migraine from tension-type headache and headache precipitating and aggravating factors that differentiate tension-type headache from migraine.

METHODS

We interviewed 38 patients with migraine and 17 patients with tension-type headache (diagnosed using International Headache Society criteria) by telephone, using a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired about the following precipitating and aggravating headache factors: (1) physical activity, (2) straining, (3) bending over, (4) stress/tension, (5) coughing/sneezing, (6) fatigue, (7) reading, (8) driving, (9) lack of sleep, (10) specific foods/drinks, (11) alcohol, (12) not eating on time, (13) smoke, (14) smell, (15) light, (16) noise, (17) menstruation, and (18) weather.

RESULTS

The most common precipitating factors acknowledged by both groups of patients were stress/tension, not eating on time, fatigue, and lack of sleep. Weather, smell, smoke, and light were the precipitating factors that differentiated migraine from tension-type headache. Excluding those factors that are part of the International Headache Society migraine diagnosis, the aggravating factors were straining, bending over, and smell. We found no precipitating or aggravating factors differentiating tension-type headache from migraine.

CONCLUSION

Apparently there are precipitating and aggravating factors differentiating migraine from tension-type headache but not vice versa. It is interesting that three of the migraine-specific precipitating factors (ie, weather, smell, and smoke) involve the nose/sinus system, suggesting a greater significance of this system in headache than is generally considered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11437890

Citation

Spierings, E L., et al. "Precipitating and Aggravating Factors of Migraine Versus Tension-type Headache." Headache, vol. 41, no. 6, 2001, pp. 554-8.
Spierings EL, Ranke AH, Honkoop PC. Precipitating and aggravating factors of migraine versus tension-type headache. Headache. 2001;41(6):554-8.
Spierings, E. L., Ranke, A. H., & Honkoop, P. C. (2001). Precipitating and aggravating factors of migraine versus tension-type headache. Headache, 41(6), 554-8.
Spierings EL, Ranke AH, Honkoop PC. Precipitating and Aggravating Factors of Migraine Versus Tension-type Headache. Headache. 2001;41(6):554-8. PubMed PMID: 11437890.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Precipitating and aggravating factors of migraine versus tension-type headache. AU - Spierings,E L, AU - Ranke,A H, AU - Honkoop,P C, PY - 2001/7/5/pubmed PY - 2002/1/5/medline PY - 2001/7/5/entrez SP - 554 EP - 8 JF - Headache JO - Headache VL - 41 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We conducted the present study to determine whether there are headache precipitating and aggravating factors that differentiate migraine from tension-type headache and headache precipitating and aggravating factors that differentiate tension-type headache from migraine. METHODS: We interviewed 38 patients with migraine and 17 patients with tension-type headache (diagnosed using International Headache Society criteria) by telephone, using a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired about the following precipitating and aggravating headache factors: (1) physical activity, (2) straining, (3) bending over, (4) stress/tension, (5) coughing/sneezing, (6) fatigue, (7) reading, (8) driving, (9) lack of sleep, (10) specific foods/drinks, (11) alcohol, (12) not eating on time, (13) smoke, (14) smell, (15) light, (16) noise, (17) menstruation, and (18) weather. RESULTS: The most common precipitating factors acknowledged by both groups of patients were stress/tension, not eating on time, fatigue, and lack of sleep. Weather, smell, smoke, and light were the precipitating factors that differentiated migraine from tension-type headache. Excluding those factors that are part of the International Headache Society migraine diagnosis, the aggravating factors were straining, bending over, and smell. We found no precipitating or aggravating factors differentiating tension-type headache from migraine. CONCLUSION: Apparently there are precipitating and aggravating factors differentiating migraine from tension-type headache but not vice versa. It is interesting that three of the migraine-specific precipitating factors (ie, weather, smell, and smoke) involve the nose/sinus system, suggesting a greater significance of this system in headache than is generally considered. SN - 0017-8748 UR - https://neuro.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11437890/Precipitating_and_aggravating_factors_of_migraine_versus_tension_type_headache_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0017-8748&date=2001&volume=41&issue=6&spage=554 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -